Released across the majority of major markets on November 22, 2013, the Microsoft Xbox One has been a symbol of strength and innovation for the company. As the eighth generation in the Xbox console series, the Xbox One totes a wide variety of upgrades over the previous iteration and is a strong contender in the heavyweight world of home video game consoles. For a more in depth look at the Xbox One and its features, read on:

Features

Games Week 2014 in Milan Italy

Games Week 2014 in Milan Italy

To stay relevant in the home entertainment market, consoles have to increase their hardware and feature capacities drastically between generations. The Xbox One has followed the trend set by Sony’s PlayStation 4 and taken a digital only approach to much of its media. External ports are only for high definition audio and video, meaning HDMI and optical audio ports are the only way to connect to a television. One nice feature of the Xbox One is that it can work well with any HDMI device, doubling as a television box that HDMI specific products can plug into for a direct feed of television shows and movies.

Aesthetics

The Xbox has never been a brand known for its aesthetic appeal. While previous generations tried to make the entire unit take the shape of an X in some way or another, the Xbox One seems to have given up on the trend. A sleek box with a small logo on the front is not the most innovative design, but it serves its purpose well. Dwelling on the visual side of a system like this isn’t by any means a deal breaker as they’ll typically end up collecting dust and performing admirably for years to come.

Performance

One of the biggest setbacks for any gaming console is going to be hard drive space. As games get larger and more resource intensive, the console itself has to keep up with the technological demands by providing adequate processing power and storage space. The Xbox One comes with what seems like a good sized hard drive with 500GB of initial disc storage space. Unfortunately, many games today can take at least 50GB of storage. Microsoft hoped to solve the problem of not being able to store enough data on the device by offering external storage units. It might have been a calculation that most customers won’t go over the 500GB storage cap, but selling a product that is lacking in one area only to end up selling another product to solve the problem is never a good sign. A series of previous problems with the Xbox series revolved around hardware failures and heat, but on this end, the Xbox One runs quietly and cool. The threat of having the dreaded red ring issue pop up is hopefully a thing of the past as Microsoft has seemingly gone to great lengths in terms of hardware durability and longevity.

Price

For the diligent shopper, terrific deals do exist for the Xbox One. Available used and in terrific condition for as low as $300, newer bundles with larger internal storage drives and different color schemes are around $400. Considering the prices of the last generation, this kind of a deal is a great chance to keep up with the newest generation of console without breaking the bank. And considering the increases and storage for only a 25% price increase, the Xbox One with 1TB of storage is a good deal all around.

Xbox One
Vastly improved performance and reliability.Exclusive titlesAffordable, especially when compared to previous generations.
Initial storage can be lacking.Poor backwards compatibility.Requires online connection with paid subscription.
4.0Overall Score
Price
Features
Performance
Aesthetics